Dissociative Events Explained

by Brooke Dulka, Ph.D.: For Complete Post, Click Here… Dissociative events — sometimes known as “dissociative seizures” — are not epileptic seizures. Rather, they are somatic manifestations (physical reactions) to psychological stress. Other terms used for dissociative events include “psychogenic nonepileptic seizures,” “psychogenic seizures,” or “functional seizures.” Some scientists have previously used the word “pseudoseizures” to describe […]
http://dlvr.it/SW6ZW7

Lyme disease epidemic? Tick-borne illness cases skyrocket 357% in rural America

By Chris Melore: For Complete Post, Click Here… The summer season is tick season and that means one thing — Lyme disease cases are going to rise in the United States. Now, a concerning new report finds rural communities have seen cases of the tick-borne illness skyrocket in recent years. Over the last 15 years, […]
http://dlvr.it/SW6YVX

Social Media and Chronic Illness: An Impact That Transcends a Screen

Nasha Addarich Martínez: For Complete Post, Click Here…

Social media has played an instrumental role in chronic illness awareness and advocacy. Here’s how people are using these platforms for the better good.

Today, more than half of US adults live with at least one chronic illness, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. If you have a chronic illness, like heart disease, arthritis or a persistent mental health condition, you know exactly how isolating it can be. Before the digital era, it was nearly impossible to connect with others who had similar illnesses, let alone see the scale of chronic illness visibility. But social media is changing that. Many people with chronic illnesses have turned to social platforms to share their stories in the hope that it’ll prove helpful to anyone experiencing a similar situation.

The exchange of health information on social media has changed how we think about chronic diseases, especially for those who have them. On one side, so-called invisible illnesses, which were rarely talked about (and likely never heard of by many), are now making their way right to our screens. On the other hand, people who have these chronic illnesses are seeing that they’re not alone and now have an accessible tool that helps them feel more supported. We’re seeing awareness of chronic illness at a scale we never have before, because of how many people with chronic diseases are using these platforms to share their stories. Social media can help spread awareness about different conditions and treatment options, connect people with similar symptoms, and even offer support from others with the same conditions. 

“In my experience, social media has been revolutionary for chronic illness and disability,” said Marie Dagenais-Lewis, operations manager at Diversability and a self-identified disabled content creator. “It has allowed us to create community around our chronic illnesses/disabilities where we can find validation, support and power in our shared experiences that gives us a sense of belonging in a world that constantly excludes us.”

Long Covid Hub for Taste and Smell Disorders

From 5th Sense: For Complete Post, Click Here… What We Do Established in 2012, Fifth Sense is the charity dedicated to smell and taste disorders. We have spent many years developing resources and information services and is comprised of a small team of employees, a Board of Trustees, an Advisory Board, Ambassadors, Volunteers and members.
http://dlvr.it/SVzsqS

Restless Legs . . .
Torture by neurotransmitter –

By Patricia Ross: For Complete Post, Click Here…

I have been plagued by RLS (Restless Leg Syndrome) for years now, sometimes dealt with by having some warm milk, walking around my apartment for a couple of hours, or more recently, by medication. Restless leg syndrome reminds me of the story of the Flying Dutchman in which a legendary ghost ship was said to never be able to make port, doomed to sail the oceans forever. Or the story of Dante’s adulterous Paolo and Francesca who are doomed to be in the fifth circle of the lustful in Dante’s Inferno. After being killed by Francesca’s jealous husband, Paolo’s brother, they get to be together forever but entwined in a tortuous embrace in Hell.

In any event, I have been prescribed a medication which is quite helpful, a medication that is a dopamine agonist also used for Parkinson’s Disease. The downside of this med is that it can be (and is) sedating, so it takes me some time to get with it the next morning. However the importance of taking this medication was brought home to me recently when I went out-of-town for two nights. Well, two nights ended up being one because I had forgotten the medication at home. The result was not sleeping even one minute of the first night. Getting up, lying down, getting up . . . almost falling asleep while standing, but then running the risk of toppling over. Lying down . . . drifting, drifting, then jerk . . . legs move involuntarily and I’m awake.

I decided that I could not go through another night of this torture. I drove home in spite of having been up for 36 hours, the restless legs guaranteeing that I would not (could not) fall asleep at the wheel. The drive was only a little over an hour, but I had to stop twice to get out of the car to walk around and alleviate the unbearable twitching of my legs, something like a cross between scratching on a blackboard and chewing on foil.

I made it home, took the medication, turned on the TV and woke up after 13 hours with the dental floss and remote in my hand. The lesson learned: keep extra medications in the car at all times, not only for when you forget, but for evacuations, emergencies and peace of mind.

The Arc: August Recess Toolkit

From The Arc National: For Complete Post, Click Here…

Each August, members of Congress leave Washington, D.C. and go back home to their states and districts. This is one of the best times of the year to engage with your elected officials and educate them about the issues that matter to people with disabilities. We need them to keep your needs in mind when they head back to Washington!

Download our free advocacy toolkit for resources, tools, and tips on educating your members of Congress about the latest issues for people with disabilities and their families.

Long Covid Hub for Taste and Smell Disorders

From 5th Sense: For Complete Post, Click Here… What We Do Established in 2012, Fifth Sense is the charity dedicated to smell and taste disorders. We have spent many years developing resources and information services and is comprised of a small team of employees, a Board of Trustees, an Advisory Board, Ambassadors, Volunteers and members.
http://dlvr.it/SVzrrd

Wearable Ultrasound Produces Images So Clear You Can See Your Own Internal Organs

By DR. KATIE SPALDING: For Complete Post, Click Here… They’re the size of a postage stamp, but they produce images in striking detail. f you’ve ever had an ultrasound, you’ll know it’s not exactly a portable process. You generally have to go to a hospital, or at the very least a doctor’s office, and a … Continue reading Wearable Ultrasound Produces Images So Clear You Can See Your Own Internal Organs
http://dlvr.it/SVptTf

Wearable Ultrasound Produces Images So Clear You Can See Your Own Internal Organs

By DR. KATIE SPALDING: For Complete Post, Click Here… They’re the size of a postage stamp, but they produce images in striking detail. f you’ve ever had an ultrasound, you’ll know it’s not exactly a portable process. You generally have to go to a hospital, or at the very least a doctor’s office, and a […]
http://dlvr.it/SVpssh

The Brookline Art Studio Helping Artists with Disabilities Thrive

From NPR: For Complete Post, Click Here…

(video on Youtube)

Gateway Arts in Brookline, Massachusetts, is an internationally acclaimed studio art center for adults with disabilities. Established in 1973, the center has served hundreds pursue a career in the arts, even selling pieces and giving 50% of profits to the artists. With staff mentorship, artists choose their mediums and develop products to sell, developing skills in various mediums.