You should be following more disability activists. Here’s where to begin.

By Chase DiBenedetto: For Complete Post, Click Here…

Diversify your social feeds and follow some of these activists, educators, and influencers.

Take a quick moment to do this check-in: Look at your Twitter, Instagram, or TikTok follows and ask yourself if any activists made the cut. How many of those accounts address ableism? Are they people who have a disability themselves? How many of those are people of color?

Regardless of your answers, it’s probably time to diversify those feeds and follow more online creators who educate and advocate for the rights of people with disabilities. It’s not just beneficial to your own feed and personal learning — these creators deserve the time and views.

Unfortunately, in the past, that hasn’t always been possible. For example, in 2019, Netzpolitik.org reported that TikTok’s moderation routinely hid content by creators with disabilities. While TikTok said it has ended the practice, these accounts still deserve digital interactions that could educate more people, help their advocacy work, and even make them a living. As fellow users, we should amplify their voices on our own profiles, trust these communities to tell their own stories, and listen to them about the impact of policy decisions and ableism at every level.

You can’t rely on social media algorithms to keep your social media feeds full of diverse experiences. It’s a personal choice to seek out and prioritize these perspectives. To start, try following some of the creators on this list, a non-exhaustive group of activists and influencers who are pushing online spaces to be more inclusive and intersectional.

@Crutches_And_Spice

@JudithHeumann

@Aaron___Philip

@HabenGirma 

@MollyBurke

@LucyEdwardsOfficial

@Chrissy.Trubiz

@PowerfullyIsa

@SoundOfTheForest

@ChloeSHayden

@WheelieErin

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