Lois Curtis: The Artist and The Disability Hero

by Seve Chambers: For Complete Post, Click Here…

Lois Curtis is a local artist with works exhibited all around the state of Georgia. She is often invited to speak at places like John Jay University in New York, the Smithsonian National Museum of American History in DC and the Georgia State Capital, and has sold her pieces all around the country. 

But many have come to know her through the Olmstead decision of 1999. Curtis was sent to live at the Georgia Regional hospital at the age of 11 after being diagnosed with mental and intellectual disabilities. She would bounce around centers, hospitals and jails throughout her childhood and teenage years as no one understood how to care for her. But she wanted to live independently through a community-living arrangement. Eventually she was deemed capable of living on her own, but the Georgia Department of Human Resources refused to provide her the proper resources. It was Sue Jamieson, an Atlanta-based legal aid attorney, who decided to represent her in a case against Tommy Olmstead, the commissioner of the Department. The lawsuit was filed with help from the Legal Aid Society, and another plaintiff, Elaine Wilson, who passed away in 2004, was also added on the side of Curtis.

The trial began in 1995, and it was during 1997 when judge Marvin Shoob ruled in favor of Curtis. This decision was appealed by the Department, and it would go all the way to the Supreme Court. It was in 1999 when judge Ruth Bader-Ginsburg and a court majority ruled it was unconstitutional to deprive Curtis and Wilson the resources needed to live independently. Ginsburg and others based their ruling on the grounds that, in isolating individuals like Curtis when they could benefit from community settings, that it was unconstitutional and a violation of their civil rights under the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Leave a Reply