In human cells and mice, a cure for the common cold, Stanford-UCSF study reports

By BRUCE GOLDMAN: For More Info, Go Here…

ngd- Thanks and a Hat Tip to Kathryn W. Why did this have to wait until I’d been exposed to most of the viruses?

Disabling a single, apparently noncritical protein in cells may foil replication of the viruses that cause half of all common colds, polio and other diseases, according to researchers at Stanford and UCSF.

“Our grandmas have always been asking us, ‘If you’re so smart, why haven’t you come up with a cure for the common cold?’”said Jan Carette, PhD, associate professor of microbiology and immunology. “Now we have a new way to do that.”

The approach of targeting proteins in our own cells also worked to stop viruses associated with asthma, encephalitis and polio.

Colds, or noninfluenza-related upper respiratory infections, are for the most part a weeklong nuisance. They’re also the world’s most common infectious illness, costing the United States economy an estimated $40 billion a year. At least half of all colds are the result of rhinovirus infections. There are roughly 160 known types of rhinovirus, which helps to explain why getting a cold doesn’t stop you from getting another one a month later. Making matters worse, rhinoviruses are highly mutation-prone and, as a result, quick to develop drug resistance, as well as to evade the immune surveillance brought about by previous exposure or a vaccine.

In a study published online Sept. 16 in Nature Microbiology, Carette and his associates found a way to stop a broad range of enteroviruses, including rhinoviruses, from replicating inside human cells in culture, as well as in mice. They accomplished this feat by disabling a protein in mammalian cells thatall enteroviruses appear to need in order to replicate.

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